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What Your Eyes Reveal About Heart and Cardiovascular Health

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Shakespeare wrote that the eyes are the window to your soul. Thanks to retinal technology, your eyes can now provide a clear picture of your cardiovascular health as well.

The Connection Between Heart and Eye Problems

During a retinal eye exam, your eye doctor will evaluate the retina vasculature, a system of blood vessels that bring blood to the retina. Since retinal blood vessels are part of the vascular system, any irregularity in retina vasculature can indicate a problem with the cardiovascular system.

Not surprisingly, there is also a connection between diseases in the eye and cardiovascular conditions. For example, patients who have atherosclerosis, or cholesterol deposits in their arteries in the rest of their body, are also likely to have them in their retinal blood vessels. This can increase the risk of developing age-related macular degeneration.

Can An Eye Exam Detect Conditions That Affect the Heart?

A comprehensive eye exam can reveal signs of diabetes and high blood pressure. Although diabetes often develops slowly, it starts to affect the blood vessels in the eyes early on.

Diabetes, a condition characterized by high blood sugar levels, damages blood vessels and cardiac nerves. It can also lead to diabetic retinopathy, which can cause vision loss. A dilated eye exam allows your eye doctor to see your blood vessels closely and spot signs of retinal damage.

Tests for glaucoma, a sight-robbing condition caused by pressure inside the eye, can also indicate high blood pressure in the rest of the body. Hypertension, like glaucoma, shows no obvious symptoms in its early stages, and both conditions are often detected only through eye exams. If your eye doctor determines that the ratio and size of retinal vessels show high intraocular pressure, they may also recommend you visit a physician to test for hypertension.

How to Maintain Heart and Eye Health

The following tips can help you keep your eyes and cardiovascular system healthy:

  • Stop Smoking
  • Maintain a healthy target weight
  • Check your lipid levels
  • Exercise regularly
  • Eat a diet rich in leafy greens, antioxidants and yellow or orange vegetables
  • Monitor your blood pressure
  • Know your medical family history
  • Schedule comprehensive eye exams regularly

Have you had a comprehensive eye exam lately? Schedule an appointment with us at Mill Creek Vision in Mill Creek to get a full picture of your eye health.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Can heart problems cause dark circles under your eyes?

  • A:Dark under-eye circles are more often a sign of a sleepless night or allergies than a serious health problem. But in some cases, under eye skin discoloration may indicate a heart or kidney problem. See your doctor if you are concerned about dark under-eye circles or other symptoms.

Q: Can smoking cause blurred vision?

  • A:Smoking is responsible for a host of health problems and can also harm your vision. The toxic carbon monoxide in cigarette smoke can create a buildup of fat in retinal blood vessels and blur your vision. There is also a link between smoking and sight-robbing conditions such as cataracts and age-related macular degeneration.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses. Visit Mill Creek Vision for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.


Should I Go To the ER For an Eye Emergency?

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Eye emergencies can be alarming, especially if you aren’t sure where to go or what to do when they occur.

At Mill Creek Vision, we’re here to take the guesswork out of navigating eye emergencies.

What’s Considered an Eye Emergency?

A wide range of conditions fall under the category of an eye emergency, but what they all have in common is that they pose a risk to your vision and eye health.

Common types of eye emergencies include:

  • Eye Infection
  • Foreign object stuck in eye
  • Eye trauma/injury
  • Scratched cornea (surface of the eye)
  • Sudden onset and increase in visual floaters or flashes
  • Sudden loss of vision
  • Moderate to severe eye pain
  • Eyes that don’t move in sync
  • Different sized pupils
  • Bleeding or discharge coming from the eye
  • One bulging eye
  • Burning, stinging or itchy eyes
  • Conjunctivitis (pink eye)
  • Chemical or heat burns

What To Do In Case of an Eye Emergency

Try to stay calm and contact Mill Creek Vision in Mill Creek without delay.
Although your first instinct may be to rush to an emergency room or urgent care center, a trip to your eye doctor can be more efficient.

That’s because urgent care facilities are often overcrowded, understaffed, or simply aren’t as experienced in the field of eye emergencies. You may be more comfortable in an eye doctor’s office, where you won’t have to wait as long to be treated.

Here’s some science to backup that point.

A 2018 study published in Ophthalmology found that 25% of eye-related conditions treated in the emergency department were diagnosed with non-urgent conditions that could have been easily treated in an optometrist’s office.

That study also noted that people who have an established relationship with a local optometrist were 10% less likely to visit the emergency room for eye-related matters.

Of course, you’ll want to use your best judgment and seek emergency medical care in cases of severe eye injuries or infections, especially those that may require surgery or hospitalization. If you aren’t sure, call Mill Creek Vision and we’ll help guide you.

We Can Treat Your Eye Emergencies

At Mill Creek Vision in Mill Creek, we offer a wide range of eye care services, including emergency eye care.

Our facility is equipped to handle all sorts of eye emergencies for your convenience and comfort.

Contact us today to learn more about our services, and ask about our emergency eye care hours.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Can bleach in the eye cause blindness?

  • A:Chlorine is a main ingredient in many household cleaners and bleaches, and can seriously damage your eye tissue if it gets in your eye. In severe cases, chlorine or bleach in the eye can cause blindness. If you get bleach or other household chemicals in your eye, immediately remove your contact lenses if you’re wearing some, and begin to irrigate your eyes with clean tap water. Then, contact your eye doctor for further instructions.

Q: What should you not do in an eye emergency?

  • A: Resist the urge to rub, press or touch your eyes, as this can cause more damage. If something is lodged or embedded in your eye, or it feels like something is stuck in your eye, don’t use an object (like a cotton swab or tweezers) to try and remove it. Only an eye care professional should remove a foreign body from your eye.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses. Visit Mill Creek Vision for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.


Most Eye Injuries Can Be Prevented With Protective Eyewear

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What if we told you that 9 out of 10 people treated for eye accidents could have prevented their injury?

Safety experts say that nearly all eye injuries can be prevented by wearing protective eyewear: safety glasses and goggles that come in both prescription and non-prescription versions.

At Mill Creek Vision in Mill Creek, we help patients keep their eyes healthy and safe, and can guide you towards the safety eyewear most suitable for you.

Who Needs Safety Glasses?

Anyone who finds themselves in a potentially hazardous environment should wear properly-fitting safety glasses to keep their eyes safe and healthy.

Common eye hazards include projectiles, chemicals, radiation, debris, sparks, and particles of metal, wood or other materials. Fast-moving balls and hockey pucks are also potential hazards.

From DIY-ers and construction workers to hobbyists, lab technicians and athletes, there’s a wide range of people who can benefit from protective eyewear. Here’s a short list of activities that require safety glasses, whether you do them professionally or for fun:

  • Woodworking
  • Metalworking
  • Glassworking
  • Gardening
  • Fishing
  • Hunting
  • Martial arts
  • Motorcycling
  • Archery
  • Fencing
  • Bicycling

What Type of Safety Glasses Do I Need?

There are several types of safety glasses and each is made for a specific purpose or activity. Wearing the incorrect type of eyewear for your activity can be just as risky as forgoing them altogether.

Some popular choices of safety glasses include:

  • Anti-fog safety glasses
  • Polarized safety glasses
  • Over-your-glasses safety glasses
  • Bifocal safety glasses
  • Laser safety glasses
  • Medical safety glasses
  • Welding goggles
  • Splash goggles
  • Color blind safety glasses

Safety glasses come in many sizes for children and adults, ensuring the most secure and comfortable fit.

Not sure which type of safety glasses you need? No problem — we can help.

Be Safe, Not Sorry

At Mill Creek Vision in Mill Creek, we know how precious your vision is, and we’re here to help you preserve it.

Whether it’s a routine eye exam or helping you select the right protective eyewear — your eyes and vision are our top priority.

To learn more about our eye care services or to schedule an appointment, call Mill Creek Vision in Mill Creek today!

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Do I need safety glasses for sports?

  • A:Yes, in many cases. Sports that require protective eyewear include but aren’t limited to shooting/hunting, lacrosse and soccer. Safety glasses are highly recommended for sports like football, baseball, basketball, tennis and racquetball. To learn if your sport or activity requires safety glasses, contact ​​Mill Creek Vision today.

Q: Do I need a second pair of safety glasses?

  • A: Whether it’s safety glasses or regular prescription glasses, having a backup pair is always a good idea in case one pair gets lost or damaged. You also may want to have another pair to switch up your look, or to protect your eyes from different activities. Your gardening safety eyewear wouldn’t be the same as your cycling glasses.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses. Visit Mill Creek Vision for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.


The Importance of Regular [Eye_Exams] for Seniors

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As the famous saying goes, ‘With age comes wisdom.’ Unfortunately, age also comes with a heightened risk of developing sight-threatening eye conditions like cataracts, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and diabetic retinopathy.

Many of these eye conditions show no obvious signs or symptoms in their initial stages, when the chances of maintaining your good vision and preventing vision loss are highest. The best way to catch eye disease early is by having regular eye exams.

So, if you’re over 60, make sure to schedule regular comprehensive eye exams at Mill Creek Vision in Mill Creek.

What Can An Eye Exam Tell You?

The purpose of a comprehensive eye exam isn’t just to evaluate your visual clarity (eyesight). During a thorough eye exam your eye doctor will also examine the inner structures of your eyes and look for anything out of the ordinary: from signs of dry eyes and allergies to eye disease and eye cancer.

In addition, an eye exam can often reveal signs of certain health conditions, such as diabetes, high cholesterol and high blood pressure.

What Is Checked During An Eye Test?

All eye exams involve a series of tests to enable your eye doctor to thoroughly evaluate your eye health and visual clarity. Most eye doctors recommend a dilated eye exam to anyone over the age of 65. Dilating your pupils gives your eye doctor a better view inside the eye. This allows an easier examination of the retina and optic nerve situated in the back of your eye.

Here are some of the tests you may encounter during your senior eye exam:

  • Preliminary tests – evaluate your depth perception, color vision, eye muscle movements and pupillary light response
  • Visual acuity – measures how clearly each of your eyes can see both near, intermediate and distant objects
  • Refraction – determines your optimum optical prescription providing clear and sharp vision at all distances
  • Digital retinal imaging – provides a high resolution, colored picture of your retina, optic nerve and the blood vessels in the back of your eye
  • Tonometry (eye pressure test) – assesses the amount of pressure within your eye to rule out glaucoma
  • Slit-lamp exam – offers a magnified view of your inner and outer eye structures, including your tears, eyelids, tear ducts, cornea, pupil, iris, lens and retina
  • Ophthalmoscopy – enables a magnified examination of the back of your eye under bright light to assess your eye health, including cataracts, retinal detachment, optic nerve damage and AMD
  • Dilated pupil exam – allows your eye doctor to view your retina and optic nerve

How Often Should Seniors Get An Eye Exam?

Most eye doctors recommend that seniors get an eye exam every year, and more frequently if you have any eye condition, diabetes or a family history of eye disease.

Regular annual eye exams are vital for maintaining your eye health and preserving your vision.

Enjoy your golden years with clear vision and healthy eyes. Contact Mill Creek Vision in Mill Creek today to schedule an eye exam.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What’s the difference between a vision screening and an eye exam?

  • A: A vision screening is a basic test that generally checks only your visual acuity, such as if you have myopia (nearsightedness). It doesn’t assess eye health or provide an optical prescription for clear vision. A vision screening can be performed by almost anyone — a nurse, a doctor or even an untrained volunteer.An eye exam can only be performed by a qualified and licensed eye doctor. This type of exam is a comprehensive way to detect any vision or eye health problems like dry eyes and allergies, and also looks for early signs of eye disease. Based on the results, your eye doctor can choose the best solution for you and your lifestyle.

Q: Can I drive after a dilated eye exam?

  • A: Pupil dilating eye drops will make your eyes more sensitive to bright light, especially sunlight. You may also experience some blurred vision for a couple of hours. So while wearing sunglasses can help to reduce light sensitivity, driving isn’t recommended after a dilated pupil exam. If you’re having a dilated eye exam, it’s best to arrange for someone to drive you home from your appointment and schedule your workday or errands accordingly.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses. Visit Mill Creek Vision for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.


Protect Your Child’s Eyesight By Encouraging Them To Play Outside

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Kids are spending increasing amounts of time on screens and less time outside playing. This is especially true with the pandemic upheaving our lives and forcing us to stay home for virtual learning or work from home. The consequences are not just limited to heightened obesity rates. Studies have shown that having less sunlight could actually change the ways that a child’s eyes develop, resulting in a myopia epidemic that rises in tandem with the obesity crisis. You need to encourage your child to spend more time outdoors to protect their eyesight and prevent myopia.

Downsides of Spending Time Indoors

According to a recent Australian study, kids who spend only about 20 minutes per day outdoors experience quicker growth in the length of their eyes than those who log more hours in bright eyes. This can result in myopia and trouble seeing faraway objects. Thankfully, there are some ways available that you can still use to keep an eye on your child’s eyesight. They are listed as follows.

Not Enough Outdoor Time

Spending at least 2-3 hours outdoors has been shown to delay or prevent the onset of myopia in children. Make sure to send your children outside to play every day, especially if they’re at risk of developing myopia!

Encourage Outdoor Time

Our eyes need an optimal amount of bright light that can be gotten from outdoors. Therefore, by aiming for around 40 minutes of outdoor time daily, not only can your children get the physical activity that they need that day, but it can also be beneficial to their eyes and help to prevent the onset of myopia.

Look out for Warning Signs

It is important to look out for warning signs that your child might have myopia so that they can get treated for it early. Children suffering from myopia may squint, constantly feel the need to rub their eyes or complain of consistent headaches, they may also start having trouble with their academic grades. If your child experiences any of these symptoms, it is important to schedule an appointment with an optometrist.

Schedule Regular Screenings

To help prevent or manage myopia, it is important to have regular eye screenings for your child. Doctors recommend yearly vision screenings either by your child’s pediatrician or their school as well as a vision screen at well-child visits through age 4. Newborn babies should also have their vision tested before they leave the hospital, and before your child hits the age of 5, it is important to take them to a pediatric ophthalmologist for a thorough checkup if they are suffering from any vision concerns or have a family history of vision concerns.

If Your Child Has Myopia, We Can Help!

What many don’t realize is that myopia can seriously affect a child’s future eye health and vision. Having myopia in childhood significantly increases the risk of developing serious eye diseases and conditions like glaucoma, retinal detachment, cataracts, and macular degeneration in adulthood.

The good news is that myopia can be effectively managed to reduce the risk of future eye disease. You can prevent serious, sight-robbing eye diseases by scheduling your child’s myopia consultation with us today. Call Mill Creek Vision 425-745-5650 to make an appointment. Help your child’s quality of life improve before your eyes!

What Are Blue Light Glasses?

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Today’s digital world has led to a dramatic increase in the amount of time people spend in front of digital screens.

While technology offers many advantages, there are also risks associated with excessive screen time. With so many people relying on their digital screens to work, study, stream entertainment, play games and socialize, these risks are nearly impossible to avoid.

Blue light-blocking glasses are designed to combat these issues head-on. At Mill Creek Vision in Mill Creek, we’ll help you find your perfect pair for ultimate eye comfort and eye health.

But First, What Exactly Is Blue Light?

Sunlight consists of a rainbow of colors, known as the visible light spectrum, which ranges from red to blue light. The blue light, also called high energy visible (HEV) light, has the shortest wavelength and carries the highest amount of energy.

In appropriate doses, natural blue light exposure can be beneficial to your physical and mental health. It can improve your memory and mood, boost alertness and regulate your body’s natural sleep/wake cycle.

However, many people are exposed to more blue light than ever before. In addition to the natural blue light emitted by the sun, all digital screens emit a low level of blue light, which can lead to symptoms of digital eye strain: headaches, eye fatigue, blurry vision, dry eyes and neck pain.

Prolonged blue light exposure has also been linked to insomnia, and scientists are now investigating whether there’s a link between blue light and eye conditions like macular degeneration and cataracts.

What Do Blue Light Glasses Do?

Blue light glasses contain specialized lenses that filter out blue light to reduce the negative effects associated with blue light exposure.

Because blue light has a high frequency energy, the eyes can’t focus as sharply and as easily as the other colors on the light spectrum. The scattered light causes a glare on the screen that impacts the clarity of your vision, leading to eye strain and fatigue.

Blue light glasses contain yellow-tinted lenses to reduce glare, increase contrast and improve visual clarity, so you won’t have to worry about digital eye strain and headaches affecting your productivity or screen time experience.

Blue light glasses are available with or without a prescription and are customized to meet your visual needs and lifestyle.

When Should You Wear Blue Light Glasses?

Whether you spend hours on the computer at work, are writing a research paper for school or just scrolling through social media on your phone, blue light-blocking glasses can make a world of difference.

That’s especially true at night, when blue light exposure can affect your natural sleep cycle and make it harder for you to fall — and stay — asleep.

So before you turn on your screen, pop on a pair of blue light glasses. Your eyes will thank you later.

Think you can benefit from blue light glasses? Call Mill Creek Vision in Mill Creek today and we’ll help you find the perfect pair.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Are there blue light glasses for kids?

  • A: Yes! Nowadays, children and teens are exposed to digital screens more than ever. Wearing blue light glasses can protect them from digital eye strain and may even help them fall asleep easier at night and sleep more soundly. That’s why many eye doctors recommend that kids wear blue light-blocking glasses any time they use a digital device.

Q: How long before bed should you avoid blue light?

  • A: Blue light exposure before bedtime can delay the production of melatonin — the sleep hormone stimulated by darkness — signaling to your brain that it’s still daytime.So try to put your digital device away 2 to 3 hours before you plan to go to bed. This will give your body a chance to produce enough melatonin to help your body relax and fall asleep.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses. Visit Mill Creek Vision for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.


When Buying Reading Glasses — Does Price Matter?

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Have you been told that you need reading glasses? If so, welcome to the club! Most people in their 40’s begin to notice their near vision declining, especially while reading and using computer screens and mobile phones.

Age-related farsightedness is a natural—if frustrating—part of the aging process. As you get older, your eyes begin to lose their ability to focus on near objects, a condition called presbyopia. Although presbyopia typically worsens over time, it’s not something to be too concerned about. Your eyes just need a little extra support. And that’s where reading glasses come in.

Are Prescription Reading Glasses Better Than OTC Readers?

Prescription reading glasses are customized to your visual needs, while over-the-counter (OTC) reading glasses are made to be “one size fits all.”’ OTC glasses don’t accurately correct your vision if one of your eyes is more farsighted than the other. OTC readers also don’t correct for any amount of astigmatism, which can result in headaches and eye strain. So at the end of the day, prescription readers are generally the recommended choice.

However, OTC readers can be helpful if you’ll only be wearing them very briefly, for reading labels at the supermarket or for other quick near-vision tasks.

But if you spend a significant amount of time each day reading written reports, working on a computer or scrolling through your phone, prescription reading glasses are the way to go.

Here are some important points to consider:

1. Your Optical Prescription Should Be Precise

Eyeglasses prescribed by your optometrist are personalized to your exact optical prescription, while pre-made OTC reading glasses contain the same prescription in each lens and don’t correct for any amount of astigmatism or other eye condition.

2. The Distance Between Your Eyes Matters

Reading glasses purchased from your eye doctor will take your pupillary distance (PD), the exact distance between your eyes, into account. This ensures that the center of each eyeglass lens is in line with each of your pupils, allowing the lens to accurately redirect light to correct your blurry vision.

Since OTC reading glasses don’t take this measure into account, long periods of reading can lead to eye strain and headaches. Curling up with a good book before bedtime while wearing OTC readers may not seem so appealing anymore.

3. Quality Is Everything

High-quality lenses are checked for distortions to ensure they meet the highest manufacturing standards before they’re dispensed. So, with prescription readers you won’t have to worry about getting dizzy or feeling off balance while reading. That’s not true of OTC readers.

Another benefit of prescription reading glasses: you choose the shape, size and quality of the frames. OTC eyeglasses are made with lower-quality materials, making them less durable and more prone to breakage or losing their shape.

4. Prescribed Reading Glasses Encourage Regular Eye Exams

If you order reading glasses from your eye doctor, you’ll be more likely to schedule regular eye exams, even if you don’t notice any changes in your vision. This is important, because many eye conditions don’t have any obvious symptoms that signal the onset of a serious eye condition. Regular eye exams are the best way to maintain good eye health and detect eye conditions early, before any vision loss has occurred.

Since OTC readers are available in varying strengths, if your vision isn’t as sharp as it used to be you may be tempted to just pick up a new pair with a stronger prescription. But without an eye exam you’re putting your eye health at risk.

When it comes to your vision, we’re here for you. Contact Mill Creek Vision in Mill Creek to check out our large selection of reading glasses and other eyewear, or to discuss any concerns you may have about your prescription.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Are reading glasses the same as computer glasses?

  • A: No, they are two different types of glasses.Reading glasses are generally prescribed for people with presbyopia, an age-related condition that causes near objects to appear blurry. Reading glasses from your eye doctor contain an optical prescription specific to your visual needs to give you clear vision for reading.
  • Computer glasses may be recommended if you spend many hours each day in front of a computer screen. These glasses help to reduce eye strain by slightly adjusting your focus so your eyes feel like they’re looking at something farther away. The lenses are also tinted to eliminate glare and filter out blue light radiation.

Q: What’s the difference between presbyopia and hyperopia?

  • A: Presbyopia and hyperopia are both refractive errors that affect near vision clarity, but they’re two very different vision conditions.
    Presbyopia (age-related farsightedness) causes the lens of the eye to stiffen, making it less able to focus on nearby objects, Presbyopia usually starts around the age of 40-45.
    Hyperopia (farsightedness that isn’t related to aging) occurs when light is unable to accurately focus onto the retina at the back of the eye due to the length of the eye or curvature of the cornea. Hyperopia can occur at any age and can cause lazy eye or eye turns if not detected in children.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasse. Visit Mill Creek Vision for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.


3 Facts about Myopia and What You Can Do For Your Child

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Myopia, often referred to as nearsightedness, is an eye disease in which the eye elongates more than it should, causing light to be focused in front of the retina instead of on the retina’s surface. Essentially, your child’s eye is growing too long.

Because the eye elongates and grows with the rest of the body, naturally, it stops elongating once the rest of the body stops growing in early adulthood. This also means there may be times in a child’s development where they experience growth spurts—suddenly requiring a higher prescription due to an increase in their myopia.

The hallmark symptom of myopia is blurred distance vision, but it can also cause headaches, eyestrain, and difficulty seeing at night.

What Causes Myopia?

Several factors lead a child to develop myopia, including genetic, environmental, and even socioeconomic status.

Excessive ‘Near Work’

More than ever before, kids all over the world are focusing their eyes on near objects for the majority of their day, whether reading a book, or using a smartphone, computer, tablet, or another device.

Numerous studies have shown that doing near work, especially in excess (more than 3 hours per day), contributes to the onset and progression of myopia.

Some findings suggest that the intensity and duration of near work are also important factors. For example, reading a captivating novel for 45 minutes straight will impact a child’s eyes more than skimming a magazine a few minutes at a time.

Genetics

A child is more likely to be myopic if one of their parents is nearsighted or myopic as well. If both parents are myopic, those chances increase even greater. Be sure to get your child’s vision checked if you or your spouse are myopic.

Not Enough Outdoor Time

Spending at least 2-3 hours outdoors has been shown to delay or prevent the onset of myopia in children. Make sure to send your children outside to play every day, especially if they’re at risk of developing myopia!

What Can You Do?

The good news is there are many things you can do you help slow or stop the progression of myopia.

Get Regular (annual or semi-annual) Eye Exams

Even if both parents aren’t myopic, it’s still recommended to get an annual eye exam for your child. You can schedule a myopia consultation with a Treehouse Eyes provider near you. Many pediatricians are able to complete basic eye exams – be sure to ask them to check for myopia!

Encourage Breaks from Excessive ‘Near Work’

More than ever before, kids are focusing their eyes on near objects for the majority of their day. Encouraging breaks from near work such as reading and electronic devices will help your child’s eyes and give them a chance to get back outside as it warms up.

Spend More Time in Natural Sunlight

As you encourage your child to take a break from near work, one of the best ways to enjoy that newfound time is to get outside! Natural sunlight, even in the classroom, can be protective of myopia. Be sure to wear some sunblock as well!

If Your Child Has Myopia, We Can Help!

What many don’t realize is that myopia can seriously affect a child’s future eye health and vision. Having myopia in childhood significantly increases the risk of developing serious eye diseases and conditions like glaucoma, retinal detachment, cataracts, and macular degeneration in adulthood.

The good news is that myopia can be effectively managed to reduce the risk of future eye disease. You can prevent serious, sight-robbing eye diseases by scheduling your child’s myopia consultation with us today. Call 425-745-5650 to make an appointment. Help your child’s quality of life improve before your eyes!

Here’s How To Choose The Perfect Pair Of Glasses!

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Nowadays, there are so many choices for eyeglass frames, it can make your head spin. Of course, these endless options also come with benefits: there are frames to suit every face, style and fashion trend.

Having all these choices is exciting, but can be overwhelming if you don’t know what you’re looking for.

In order to pick the perfect pair, it’s good to have a basic understanding of the different materials, features and styles out there, so you can make an informed decision.

Try to keep in mind that although you may be looking for that ‘wow’ factor, comfort, durability and quality are key. After all, you’ll likely be wearing your new specs for a good part of your day.

Here are 5 tips to help you find the glasses that most suit you and your lifestyle:

1. Know Your Material Options

Eyeglass frames come in a variety of materials. Your winning pair can be made from metal, plastic or even wood.

Metal

Metal frames can be found in a wide range of styles and are renowned for their strength and durability. But not all metal frames are the same. There’s a range of metals used for eyeglass frames, each with their own advantages:

  • Titanium: Hypoallergenic, strong, durable, lightweight and corrosion-resistant.
  • Beryllium: Strong, lightweight, flexible, corrosion-resistant and less expensive than titanium.
  • Steel: Strong, lightweight (but heavier than titanium), corrosion-resistant and less expensive than most other metal frames.
  • Monel: Flexible and corrosion-resistant, but contains a combination of metals — so not a first choice if you’re hypersensitive to any type of metal.
  • Aluminum: Flexible, strong, corrosion-resistant, but typically more expensive than other metal frames.
  • Flexon: Very flexible, lightweight, hypoallergenic and corrosion-resistant.

Plastic

Plastic frames are available in a dizzying variety of shapes, styles and colors. They offer a bolder look than metal frames and are often less expensive as well. But plastic frames don’t offer the same degree of durability that metal frames do, so if you’re looking for longer-lasting frames, this is something to consider before making your purchase.

Wood

Wooden frames aren’t only trendy; they’re also very lightweight and comfortable. Wooden frames are made of pure, natural wood and are stained using plant-based treatments — making them an eco-friendly option. They’re also a great choice if you’re looking for a hypoallergenic frame.

2. Understand that Size Does Matter

Eyeglass frames come in so many different sizes. You may want to opt for a smaller frame for reading glasses, but for all day-wear consider a larger frame that will give you a larger viewing window and a wider peripheral view.

3. Choose Comfort

Bridge Fit

Your eyeglasses should sit comfortably on the bridge of your nose. If they’re too big, you’ll constantly be pushing them up, and if they’re too small, they’ll sit too high or pinch your nose.

Temple Style

The temples of your eyeglasses are what secure your frames to your face. They connect the front of the frames to the back of the ears, and sometimes wrap around the head. Most frame temples range from 120 to 150 mm in length. To check that your glasses fit properly, move your head from side to side and even bend down at the waist (it’s worth it!) to make sure that the frames you choose won’t easily fall off.

4. Consider Flexibility

If you lead an active lifestyle, have young children, or sometimes fall asleep with your glasses on, you may want to consider spring hinges. Spring hinges give your temples greater flexibility, making them less likely to break if they’re grabbed or bent the wrong way.

5. Try Different Styles

Not sure which shape or color suits you best? Try on as many frames as you’d like until you find a style that you love. You can either pick a frame that matches your face shape and hair color or decide to be a bit more daring and go for a more striking look. Your options are endless.

When it comes to your vision, we’re here for you. Contact Mill Creek Vision in Mill Creek to check out our large selection of eyewear. We’ll help you find the perfect pair, with the perfect fit.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Are metal frames strong enough for sports?

  • A: While metal frames can withstand a certain amount of wear and tear, they aren’t recommended for sports. If you play sports on a regular basis, protective eyewear is the way to go. Protective eyewear, like sports goggles and wraparound frames, not only contain high-impact-resistant polycarbonate lenses, but are also lined with rubber padding to protect your eyes from injury.

Q: Is one pair of eyeglasses enough?

  • A: Depending on your lifestyle and visual needs, one pair of eyeglasses may not suffice.Here are some questions to ask yourself when deciding if you need a second pair of glasses:
      • Do you lead an active lifestyle? If so, it’s important to have a back-up pair of glasses, just in case.
      • Do you have two different optical prescriptions? Some people prefer two different pairs of glasses over wearing bifocal or multifocal lenses.
      • Do you worry about breaking or losing your glasses and having to scramble to order another pair?
      • Do you want your frames to match your wardrobe? Then you may want to think about purchasing more than one frame.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses. Visit Mill Creek Vision for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.


Protect Your Eyes This Spring by Adopting These 5 Habits

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Spring is in the air! The warm weather, blossoming flowers and smell of freshly cut grass is a welcome relief for anyone who’s ready to put winter behind them. Walks in the park. Barbecues. Playgrounds full of children.

Despite all the spring excitement, it’s important to know that the change in weather can affect your eyes in more ways than one — from prolonged UV exposure and a heightened risk of eye injuries to dry eyes and allergies.

Here are 5 practical ways to protect your eyes this season:

1. Wear Sunglasses with 100% UV Protection

UV protection isn’t only essential for your skin, but also for your eyes.

Prolonged unprotected exposure to the sun’s strong UVA and UVB rays can cause ‘eye sunburn’ (photokeratitis), and UV exposure over months or years can put you at risk of developing sight-threatening eye diseases in the future.

Which is why sunglasses are more than just a fashion accessory. When shopping for sunglasses, look for the label that says ‘100% UV protection.’ This way, you can enjoy the sun without a second thought for your eyes.

And if you believe sunglasses are only meant for sunny days, think again. The sun’s UV rays are so powerful that they penetrate through the clouds and reflect off of water, snow, ice, concrete and many other surfaces.

So before you head out the door, be sure to grab a pair of shades. For even greater protection, also wear a cap or wide-brimmed hat.

2. Drink Plenty of Water

Drinking water — especially on a hot day— is important not only for your overall health, but the health of your eyes. If your body becomes dehydrated your eyes will too, which can lead to symptoms of dry eye and other complications.

Many doctors recommend drinking six 8-ounce glasses of water each day, and more if you’re playing sports or spending lots of time in the sun. So keep a bottle of water close by and drink, drink, drink!

3. Hydrate Your Eyes

Sometimes, drinking water isn’t enough to keep dry eye symptoms at bay.

If your eyes are dry, irritated, itchy or bloodshot, you may have dry eye syndrome. Dry air and wind, air-conditioning and heating systems, certain medications and medical conditions can all cause dry eyes.

Call Mill Creek Vision in Mill Creek to schedule a dry eye assessment and learn about your treatment options.

4. Wear Protective Eyewear

The beautiful spring weather calls for outdoor sports, bonfires, barbeques — and in some places, fireworks. Although these activities may be fun, they also pose a risk to your eye health and vision.

To protect your eyes from injury and exposure to extreme heat and smoke, make sure to wear protective eyewear like sports goggles or specialized glasses with polycarbonate lenses.

Most eye injuries can be prevented with the right kind of eye protection.

5. Seek Allergy Relief

Does the mere thought of springtime make your eyes tear and your nose run? You’re not alone. Seasonal allergies are common, and can be frustrating, especially when you’ve been looking forward to spending more time outdoors.

If you suffer from eye allergies, even a morning jog around the block can have you rubbing your eyes for the rest of the day.

Fortunately, there are ways to effectively treat eye allergies and make irritated, itchy eyes a thing of the past.

Contact Mill Creek Vision in Mill Creek to learn about the different dry eye and allergy treatments we offer, or to choose eyewear that protects your eyes from sun exposure and injury. We’re here to help you protect your eyes this spring and always.

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: What is Dry Eye syndrome?

A: Dry eye syndrome (DES) is a chronic condition that occurs when your eyes don’t produce enough tears, or there is insufficient oil in your tears.

Some of the most common causes of DES include:

  • Environmental factors – living in a dry, dusty or windy climate
  • Hormonal changes – especially during pregnancy and menopause
  • Certain medications – antihistamines, blood pressure medications and antidepressants, among others
  • Eyelid conditions – like meibomian gland dysfunction and blepharitis
  • Post-LASIK surgery

Symptoms can be mild or severe and cause your eyes to feel dry, sore, itchy, and watery. Treatment for DES varies, depending on the underlying cause, but can range anywhere from medicated eye drops and ointments to in-office procedures.

Q: How are eye allergies treated?

A: The most effective way to treat your eye allergies is to first find out what’s causing them.

Eye allergies can be triggered by:

  • Airborne substances found in nature such as pollen from flowers, grass and trees
  • Indoor allergens such as pet dander, dust and mold
  • Irritants such as cosmetics, chemicals, cigarette smoke and perfume

To alleviate your symptoms, your eye doctor may recommend OTC lubricating eye drops, medicated eye drops that replace the oil in your tears, or eye drops (or oral medications) that contain an antihistamine.

If these eye drops don’t provide enough relief, your eye doctor can discuss a range of in-office treatments or prescribe a stronger medication to provide long-lasting relief for your allergic eyes.

Quality Frames For Prescription Eyeglasses & Computer Glasses. Visit Mill Creek Vision for an eye exam and eyeglasses that match your style.


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